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Proof That The Ocean Recycles

Proof That The Ocean Recycles

A new discovery has uncovered that the rare blue diamond actually forms at the bottom of the ocean

In the movie Titanic, there is talk of a special blue diamond necklace in the shape of a heart referred to as the "heart of the ocean." This necklace is said to be worth hundreds of thousands of dollars due to its rarity. This is a fictional necklace; however, the blue diamonds are very real and interestingly enough - these diamonds are best formed in the heart of the ocean. 

 Photo courtesy of 20th Century Fox

Photo courtesy of 20th Century Fox

 Evan Smith, a scientist in New York City has spent two years studying boron - a chemical element - along with other elements and minerals that are involved in the process of making a diamond. The color of these diamonds, which can range anywhere from pale gray to deep blue gray to full on deep royal blue, is determined by the amount of boron that the diamond collects in its formation. This new discovery is the key to scientists beginning to truly understand and study Earth's deepest parts. 

The diamonds that make it to the deep royal blue color - often referred to as the "hope diamond," only make up .02% of all diamonds. These diamonds are proof that the ocean recycles. Hope diamonds have been found all around the world in volcanic deposits ranging anywhere from 90 million years to 1.2 billion years old. The boron that turns these diamonds their deep shade of blue is a very rare boron that is only found in the Earth's mantle and crust. 

 

What's new?

A study was published yesterday on Nature that stated that scientists now have a new theory involving these diamonds. Their research has shown that these blue diamonds carry traces of minerals that come from two different types of rocks: the oceanic crust from the Earth's surface and the ocean mantle. The diamonds meet these two different rocks through tectonic movements in the plates at the earth's core. These movements release a boron that is naturally found in the ocean's water and turns the diamonds their color of deep blue. 

 Photo courtesy of Quora

Photo courtesy of Quora

 

How much does one of these diamonds cost?

According to Google if you wanted to buy one of these rare blue diamonds, it would cost you approximately $50,000 for a light colored loose blue diamond, $135,000 for an intense blue diamond, and $200,000 for a medium toned 1 carat blue diamond. So, we'd suggest you start saving now if you'd like to buy one of these gems...or buy some scuba gear and see if you can find one diving?

What do you think about these rare blue diamonds? Let us know in the comments section below! And be sure to subscribe to The Sitch for all the latest news. 

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