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Is The Sony RX100 VI Really Worth $1,200?

Is The Sony RX100 VI Really Worth $1,200?

The latest version of the Sony RX100 is one of the most expensive point-and-shoots available

Sony recently released their latest version of the RX100, which rocks a seriously compact body and has a few features worth gawking about.

 Image courtesy of Sony

Image courtesy of Sony

Image Quality

The RX100 now has an all-new, longer-zooming (8.00x zoom) lens that packs quite a punch. The Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* 24-200mm f/2.8-4.5 lens is the longest zoom lens produced in the RX100 line. The 1-inch Exmor RS stacked CMOS sensor shoots 20.10 Megapixel stills and 4K HDR video up to 30 fps. RAW photos can be captured at a ridiculous 24 frames per second.

Its autofocus is pretty fast too (315 PDAF points covering around 65% of the imaging area), with a 0.03s Hybrid AF speed, and continuous Eye AF that is twice as fast as the RX100 V. The RX100 has a native ISO of 125 - 12,800 and an extended ISO of 80 - 25,600. Unfortunately, continuous 4K video clip recording time is limited to just five minutes, but full HD recording can still extend to 29'59".

The RX100 VI also has several advanced and professional-focused video features, including HDR movie recording (Hybrid Log Gamma), as well as S-Log3 and S-Log2 gamma curves that allow for better dynamic range and flexibility when it comes to post-production color grading. The camera also includes Gamma Display Assist, exposure zebras, clean HDMI output, Timecode (TC/UB), Rec Control, marker functions, and proxy recording. Below are some sample photos from the DP Review that really show off this camera in a variety of elements.

 

Build

The RX100 VI is seriously small. With the battery, it only weighs 10.6 oz (301 g) and easily fits in your pocket. When retracted, the lens is only a half-inch thick. There’s now a cool pop-up EVF and tilting LCD screen which finally has a three-inch screen with touchscreen functionality.

The camera also includes a pop-up flash, although Sony's had to make the flash smaller and weaker than on the previous model. The new and improved battery now allows for 240 shots when using the monitor and 220 with the EVF.

Similarly to previous models, you can still charge the camera via USB. One thing that we would love to see in the next model that is still missing in the VI is the lack of a 3.5mm audio jack. Because of this, anyone using the camera for vlogging is still stuck with the build in microphone.

 Photo courtesy of  Cameralabs

Photo courtesy of Cameralabs

 

Slow Motion

In addition to the amazing zoom capability (seriously, being able to go from 24-200mm focal length at a 2.8 aperture with such a small camera is insane), one of the biggest selling points of the RX100 VI is its slow-motion capabilities. It’s able to shoot higher frame rates at 250, 500 or 1,000 frames per second. This is great for anyone wanting to get super buttery slowmo shots for their videos  - Even the pro cine camera like the Red line can only shoot up 300 fps (albeit at 2K). Watch the video below to see what the slow-motion video quality looks like on the RX100 line.

 

Conclusion

Even though this is quite an impressive camera and hands down the best point-and-shoot on the market, the question everyone is asking is whether it’s worth the $1,200 price tag. For that amount, you could get a Sony A6500 or spend a little more and get an A7iii, both of which offer interchangeable lenses and bigger sensors. But if you're still looking to purchase the RX100 VI, then you can find one on Amazon here.

Let us know what you think in the comments section below and be sure to subscribe to The Sitch for more tech reviews and entertaining reads.

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